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October 12th, 2017

By 2030, it is estimated that the United States will lack between 40,800 and 104,900 physicians. Moreover, there is a maldistribution of physicians across and within states. To address these projected shortages, some states, depending on their current environment, could bolster their supply of physicians by increasing their existing medical school enrollment or building new medical schools. We used data from the Medicare Physician Compare database to examine state retention of their medical school graduates and how a variety of factors, such as physician age, specialty, and gender, were related to a physician’s likeliness of practicing in their medical school state. We also analyzed the relationship between state retention of physicians and number of physicians per capita. We found that on average, states retain 38 percent of their medical school graduates and physicians who pursue a non-primary care specialty are more likely to leave their medical school state. We also observed a significant negative correlation between state retention and number of physicians per capita. Additional medical schools may not sufficiently address some state’s physician shortage unless other measures are also pursued, such as increasing residency positions. As states assess their physician supply and medical school graduate retention, there is also an opportunity for states to incorporate more value-based care training into the curriculum of both their existing and new medical schools. States may also consider encouraging the use of physician and non-physician care teams as an additional strategy to addressing their primary care physician shortage.

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October 12th, 2017

A RevCycleIntelligence article entitled “Specialists Face 16% MIPS Payment Adjustment Swing Under Proposal” references the Leavitt Partners “Medicare Alternative Payment Models: Not Every Provider has a Path Forward” white paper. The article states, “However, recent research from Leavitt Partners revealed that specialists have few, if any, APM options. Specialists from emergency medicine and audiology had no Medicare alternative payment model opportunities and respiratory therapists only had three models they can join.”

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October 11th, 2017

Salt Lake City, October 11, 2017 –  In the coming decades, many states are projected to have a shortage of both specialty and primary care physicians. Today, Leavitt Partners released “Majority of Physicians Do Not Practice in the State They Graduated Medical School,” a new white paper examining each state’s retention of their medical school […]

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October 10th, 2017

A HFMA Healthcare Business News article entitled “ACOs Adding Risk, but Lag at Cost Control” discusses results from the Leavitt Partners and NAACOS 2017 ACO Survey. The article notes overall trends regarding ACOs assuming financial risk and the authors’ commentary on the current state of ACOs. The article also cites the 2016 “Accountable Care Organizations and Risk-based Payment Arrangements: Strong Preference for Upside-only Contracts” Leavitt Partners white paper.

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October 10th, 2017

A Modern Healthcare article entitled “Delivery system reform hampers ACO progress on risk-based contracts” cites the Leavitt Partners and NAACOS “The 2017 ACO Survey: What Do Current Trends Tell Us About The Future Of Accountable Care?” Health Affairs blog. The article states, “Roughly 50 percent of ACOs are involved in at least one downside risk contract, such as shared savings and capitation contracts, according to a Leavitt Partners and National Association of ACOs report recently published in Health Affairs.” The article was also featured in the KHN Morning Brief.

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October 9th, 2017

A Cambridge Management Group post cites the Leavitt Partners and NAACOS “The 2017 ACO Survey: What Do Current Trends Tell Us About The Future Of Accountable Care?” Health Affairs blog. The post provides a brief summary of the survey and links to the Health Affairs blog and a recent FierceHealthcare article covering the survey.

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October 6th, 2017

In this piece, Governor Leavitt expresses his support of extending the Community Health Center Fund, stating, “I personally see it is a continuation of GOP willingness to foster programs that provide care for the underserved and help improve our communities in the most efficient way. Leadership might consider lengthening the term of the community health center funding extension in consideration of other needed entitlement reforms.” He also provides his personal insights into the value of Community Health Centers (CHCs) based on his previous experience as Governor of Utah and the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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October 6th, 2017

A Healthcare Informatics article entitled “A Health Affairs Study Finds ACOs Moving Forward Quickly—If Unevenly—Into Risk” highlights the Leavitt Partners and NAACOS “The 2017 ACO Survey: What Do Current Trends Tell Us About The Future Of Accountable Care?” Health Affairs blog. The article summarizes key findings and observations and links directly to the blog.

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October 4th, 2017

Washington, D.C., October 4, 2017 — Today the National Association of ACOs (NAACOS) and Leavitt Partners released the results from their first Annual ACO Survey in a Health Affairs article entitled “The 2017 Annual ACO Survey: What Do Current Trends Tell Us About The Future of Accountable Care.” Two-hundred and forty unique ACOs, representing one quarter of all known Medicare, Medicaid, and commercial ACOs, participated in the 2017 survey. Results provide an important view into the current state of ACOs as well as their plans for the future.

The findings shed light on ACOs’ participation in other Alternative Payment Models (APMs), common improvement activities, organizational and contract structures, and investments. Andrew Croshaw, CEO of Leavitt Partners, stated “With more than 32 million patients receiving care from ACOs nationwide, ACOs are now an important part of the American health care landscape, and the need to understand them better is becoming increasingly more important. The Annual ACO Survey provides one of the most comprehensive views into the growing ACO industry.”

Survey results indicate that ACOs are becoming more willing to take on financial risk; however, a successful transition to risk will only occur when they have the ability and infrastructure in place to take on and manage that risk. Clif Gaus, Sc.D., President and CEO of NAACOS said, “There are many opportunities to support the ACO movement, especially among policy makers and researchers. Everyone wants value-based care, but in order to do that we need to support, learn, and continuously improve. We’re all learning. Let’s do that together.”

Press contacts
National Association of ACOs: Clif Gaus at 202-640-1898 or cgaus@naacos.com
Leavitt Partners: Jordana Choucair, senior director of communications, 801.538.5082 or Jordana.Choucair@leavittpartners.com

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October 3rd, 2017

According to an op-ed co-authored by Governor Leavitt and Mark McClellan, CMS’ recent announcement regarding a new direction for CMMI rightly emphasizes the inclusion of drugs and other innovative medical products in payment reform efforts. The authors also encourage CMS to provide more support for state-led payment reform efforts that include public and private payers and notes that CMS could potentially accelerate progress by supporting clinicians and private payers in sharing insights about how health care providers can succeed in new approaches to delivering care. The piece, entitled “The Next Round of Payment Reform,” was published in STAT.

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